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Clemson, University of South Carolina and College of Charleston teams set to battle for Tennis On Campus State Championship

October 23, 2015 09:10 AM

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Seven collegiate tennis clubs from across the state will head to Charleston this weekend with one goal in mind: winning a state tennis championship.

Lauren_Denuel
Denuel

Three teams from Clemson and the College of Charleston and one from the University of South Carolina will compete at the USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina Championship.

The annual championship, which starts Saturday morning at the downtown Charleston Tennis Center, will feature more than 50 college students playing for bragging rights and the chance to advance closer to the USTA Tennis On Campus National Championship, scheduled for April 14-16, 2016, in Cary, North Carolina.

“We’re hoping to make it this year,” said Lauren Denuel, the president of the University of South Carolina club tennis team.

The Gamecocks made it to nationals two years ago, when Denuel was a freshman. At the championship, she saw old high school friends from Virginia and played tennis with some of the best club players in the country.

“It was just so much fun,” she said. “I really want to make it to nationals for (our seniors).”

The Clemson team, meanwhile, played at nationals earlier this year. The Tigers won the USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina Championship last fall for the first time since at least 2004. The club team then played well enough at the USTA Tennis On Campus Southern Championship to advance to nationals.

At nationals, though, the Tigers faced tough competition and went 0-3. “Hopefully we can go again and do better,” said Jennifer Anderson, president of the Clemson club tennis team.

The College of Charleston club team last played at nationals in 2013, when the Cougars won the USTA Tennis On Campus Southern Championship, which draws the best collegiate club teams from nine states: South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas.

USTA Tennis On Campus is designed to increase recreational tennis participation and provide socially competitive coed team play for students on college campuses. The USTA Tennis On Campus program features more than 35,000 college students competing nationwide in intramural and intercollegiate coed club play using the World TeamTennis format.

Since its inception in 2000, Tennis On Campus has grown significantly and today is played on more than 650 college campuses across the country. Developed by the USTA in partnership with NIRSA, World TeamTennis and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association, the Tennis On Campus program gives college students the opportunity to build leadership skills, network in a coed sports environment and compete on a college team without the rigors of playing in a varsity program.

With year-round match play and regional and national championship competition, students maintain active and healthy lifestyles through their college years. For more information, go to tennisoncampus.com or sctennis.com/toc.

Wide_practice_USC
Members of the University of South Carolina club team practice at courts on campus. The USC team will be one of seven playing at the USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina Championship this weekend. (USTA SC photo)

USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina Championship draws

USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina Championship schedule

9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday: Round robin play

9 a.m. Sunday: Round robin play continues

11 a.m. Sunday: State championship

Past USTA Tennis On Campus South Carolina champions

2014 – Clemson University

2013 – University of South Carolina

2012 – College of Charleston

2011 – University of South Carolina

2010 – College of Charleston

2009 – College of Charleston

2008 – College of Charleston

2007 – University of South Carolina

2006 – College of Charleston

2005 – Furman University

 

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