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How to use Junior Team Tennis to grow your tennis business and more from the 2015 USTA South Carolina Annual Meeting

December 9, 2015 11:02 AM

By Jonathon Braden, USTA South Carolina

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. – About 350 people gained inspiration and knowledge at the 2015 USTA South Carolina Annual Meeting last weekend at the Wild Dunes Resort.
 
The meeting, which started Friday and finished Sunday, let the USTA SC board and volunteer committees focus their work for 2016. The gathering also featured prominent guest speakers, including USTA First Vice President Andy Andrews, who updated attendees on key 2016 USTA goals.
 
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The annual meeting also featured a review of how 2015 went for tennis in South Carolina. (USTA SC photo)


Those goals include growing tennis with groups the USTA hasn’t reached as well as it could, including Hispanics and individuals ages 18-35.

Andrews highlighted young professional leagues such as “Sets In The City” as ways for communities should reach young professionals. USTA South Carolina launched its own young professionals league earlier this year in Columbia called “Serve. Rally. Pour.”

Andrews, who spoke at the business meeting portion of the gathering, also updated those in attendance on the progress of renovations taking place at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York.

Craig Jones, USTA director of junior play, educated coaches and tennis professionals on how to grow their businesses through Junior Team Tennis, co-ed team tennis for kids ages 6-18. Through JTT, boys and girls play their matches and all of the match scores count toward the team total, which determines if the team wins or loses.

Jones said when kids play tennis on a team as opposed to on their own at a tournament, there are three possible outcomes, and only one is less than ideal.

  • The child wins but his or her team loses. Still good.
  • The child loses but his or her team wins. Still good.
  • The child loses and his or her team loses. The only possible bad outcome.

On Saturday of the annual meeting, USTA South Carolina also hosted an awards luncheon for its 2015 Annual Award recipients.

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For more information about the 2015 USTA South Carolina Annual Meeting, go here.

 

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