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TEACHING ADAPTIVE TENNIS | USTA GRANTS | GET INVOLVED

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Special athletes with WTA professionals Vania King and Alla Kudryavtsevaial athletes with WTA professionals Vania King and Alla Kudryavtseva
 
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Special athletes training with College of Charleston ladies tennis team. 
 

The Special Olympics South Carolina Spring Fling had over a 120 special athletes. The competition included skills, singles, and doubles and event was hosted by the Cayce Tennis Center. 

The special athletes in Charleston also had fun doing a demo at the WTA Volvo Cars Open and had a training session with the College of Charleston Women’s Tennis Team.
 

 

 

 

2016 Upcoming Events

 

 

Special Olympics Tennis Resources


 

Kelly Garrick

Special Olympics South Carolina

Director of Sports and Competition
(803) 772-1555, ext 302

KGarrick@so-sc.org

 


Adaptive Tennis’ goal is to promote and develop recreational tennis opportunities for individuals with differing abilities and circumstances through inclusion, knowledge, and support, and by providing, where needed, adaptive programming, equipment, and teaching techniques.
 
Tennis benefits both mind and body.  Physically, playing tennis helps to improve balance, mobility, agility, strength, fitness, and to burn calories. Mentally, tennis works on one’s focus, concentration, and reactive and problem-solving behaviors.  Emotionally it can promote self-confidence, instill feelings of success, relieve stress, and provide social outlets to meet new friends, enhance relationships, or experience great family outings.  These benefits are so much more important for those with disabilities, in special life situations, or with special circumstances.
 
The following areas are under the USTA Adaptive Tennis umbrella:
  • Developmental disabilities (learning disabilities, autism, Down Syndrome, intellectual disabilities)
  • Physical disabilities (players with prostheses, players in wheelchairs, players undergoing rehabilitation, such as surgery and illness, birth defects, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, muscular dystrophy, hearing impaired, stroke, etc.)
  • Consumers of mental health services (psychiatric needs, emotional needs)
  • Environmental disabilities (substance abusers, mentally and physically abused, homeless, HIV positive individuals, etc.)

 

Typical

Adapted

Site

A regulation court at a tennis facility

Indoors in a gymnasium or multi-purpose room; Outdoors on a blacktop area

Court

Singles 78’ by 27’
Doubles 78’ by 36’

Scale court to available space using chalk or plastic "throw down" lines.  In gymnasiums lines may already be painted that will work for a scaled court.

Net

3- 3.5’ high; permanent fixture

Portable nets are available in 10’ & 18’ wide models.

Racquet

Length: 27"; Weight: 11.5 oz.

Progression of hand paddle to graduated length racquets (17" to 27").
Weight: less than 8 oz. to 12 oz.

Ball

Regular optic yellow

Bean bags, balloons, beach ball, foam ball; low compression ball, or regular optic yellow.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
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